policymic:

23 ways feminists have made the world better for women

It may seem like a bizarrely obvious statement, but somewhere between earning women the right to vote, pushing through legislation opening up universities to female students and advancing the Civil Rights movement (to name just a very few examples), feminism has indeed made life much, much better (and as a result, happier) — not just for American women, but American men as well. Far removed from the stereotypical and inaccurate image of the bra-burning activist, feminists have proven time and time again that women’s rights are human rights. And as the Declaration of Independence so elegantly points out, the ideals of life and liberty are intrinsically tied up with that third pursuit: happiness. 

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nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)
Today’s top book news item:
Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.
Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.

nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)

Today’s top book news item:

Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.

Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.